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Canadian Election

The Dirt :: The Canadian Election Edition, Vol. 2

Editors | Tar Sands Solution Network - August 27th 2015

Blog Post: Until October 19, The Dirt will bring you the latest news on how Canadians are trying to make climate policy an important part of the next federal election. In this issue, an Aboriginal community in the heart of the tar sands region has built a solar energy project so it doesn’t have to rely on fossil fuels, and Canadian climate activists bird-dog Canadian politicians for the third week in a row.

Climate Impacts, Canadian Election

How a cardboard sign and a Sharpie forced climate change onto the campaign trail

Feature

August 27th 2015

Blog Post: Yesterday, local activists disrupted Stephen Harper’s campaign stop in Montreal to remind him that you can’t avoid the issue of climate and tar sands expansion if you’re campaigning to be leader of this country. In a packed room of supporters in the suburban riding of Pointe-Claire, one climate activist interrupted the Prime Minister’s speech, as several other organizers rallied outside the venue.

Economic Factors, Petrostate Politics, Canadian Election

How low can it go? Collapsing crude in election season

Feature

Hannah McKinnon | Oil Change International - August 26th 2015

Blog Post: In the lead up to the Canadian federal election, the economy is front and centre, but not in the way the incumbent government would have liked. The Conservatives have gone to great lengths to brand themselves as good economic managers, but with the Canadian dollar hitting its lowest point in over a decade, their election case is losing credibility fast. The Harper Government focussed too much attention on the Alberta tar sands, and when crude oil prices crashed late last year, the strategic weaknesses of this plan were clear.

Petrostate Politics

What the Globe and Mail editorial missed on pipeline reviews

August 21st 2015

Blog Post: Last Saturday’s Globe and Mail editorial assessed the positions of the four major political parties in Canada on pipelines, and they have promised to return to the topic this weekend. It was another sign of just how important energy and environment is to this election, but it missed a few important aspects.

Energy East

Energy East pipeline threatens endangered whales and sea life

Feature

August 20th 2015

Blog Post: The Conservation Council of New Brunswick recently released a report warning that the proposed Energy East pipeline will have serious consequences for whales and other sea life in the Bay of Fundy and the Gulf of Maine. Increased tanker traffic would stress the most endangered whale species in the world, and any leaks or spills would endanger the Bay of Fundy’s important fishing industry.

Climate Impacts, Petrostate Politics, Canadian Election

It’s time to change Canada’s climate politics

Cam Fenton | 350.org - August 19th 2015

Blog Post: On October 19th, people across Canada will head to the polls and then, just a few weeks later, hundreds of world governments will meet in Paris to try to strike a global climate agreement. In Paris our governments are supposed to agree on a shared target for climate action, and then propose national plans to meet that goal -- but the numbers just aren’t adding up. Everything being discussed will allow too many communities that have polluted the least to be devastated by floods, rising sea levels and other disasters.

Climate Impacts

Climate change panel and consultation plan signal a shift in Alberta

Feature

Ed Whittingham | Pembina Institute - August 17th 2015

Blog Post: Pembina Institute’s Ed Whittingham says the new process for determining the fate and future of the oil sands and climate policy is "a well-balanced line up of experts who bring a mix of perspectives and experience to guide its climate change consultation process. A broad and transparent consultation process will provide valuable input as the province seeks to develop a credible climate strategy that reflects the priorities and concerns of Albertans."