Tar Sands Solutions Network

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Stop the Expansion

Few Canadians are aware how fast the tar sands have grown. In its obsession with rapid expansion, the Alberta government has approved more than 100 tar sands projects covering 92,000 square kilometres of northern boreal forest, with another 100 projects covering an additional 50,000 square kilometres proposed or under review. Current industry plans will expand production more than 3X from current levels, all but guaranteeing the destruction of the earth's climate.

However, the indefinite delay of Total's Josyln North tar sands mine is a clear indication that industry’s growth forecasts are not accurate and a sign that the continued expansion of the tar sands is anything but inevitable. Tar sands are high cost, high risk, and high carbon. Josyln North’s mothballing is the latest in a developing trend that doesn't bode well for the industry's future. The economics of the tar sands are marginal today, and nd in a carbon constrained world, they become increasingly unviable.

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Overview:
- The tar sands are the largest industrial project on Earth, and it's growing fast
Key Problems:
- Industry plans to triple productionby 2030
- Dramatic negative impacts are being ignored  
- There are literally no limits on continued expansion
Current Status:
- Current planned expansion is in line with global demand scenarios for a 6 degree global temperature rise.
- Cancellation of Total's Joclyn North tar sands mine indicates expansion is not inevitable. 

Today, tar sands development produces 1.9 million barrels of tar sands oil per day (BPD), up from 300,000 BPD in 1999. But the oil industry is just getting started. The rapid approval and construction of tar sands projects will more than triple output over the next 17 years. Industry estimates indicate production capacity will explode to more than five million BPD by 2030. The tar sands industry already has announced plans to increase production to nine million barrels per day.

There is literally no limit to the amount of tar sands development the Alberta and Canadian governments are willing to allow – despite the serious social, economic and environmental problems this growth will unleash on the world.

Most of the oil produced today is from giant, open-pit mines. Bitumen is torn from the ground and upgraded in enormous factories. This process destroys immense amounts of forest and wildlife habitat, creates toxic tailings ponds the size of lakes, and pollutes the region's rivers and streams with dangerous chemicals. The future of tar sands development relies on an a different process, called in situ (Latin for "in place") extraction. Here, steam and chemicals are injected deep underground, where the bitumen melts and is pumped to the surface. In situ extraction uses tremendous amounts of water, and because it requires turning water into steam, it uses an enormous amount of energy, which means it creates an enormous amount of climate-warming greenhouse gases.

The size and scale of Alberta's tar sands experiment is gargantuan. Together, more than 100 mining and in situ operations are dewatering the Athabasca River, poisoning streams and rivers, warming the climate, and driving caribou to extinction. It is also consuming the traditional lands of the region's First Nations people and preventing them from exercising their constitutionally protected right to hunt and fish in a region that is being turned into an industrial moonscape.

For whose benefit? Oil companies, most of which are foreign owned. This means that Canadians aren’t getting their fair share of the benefits of tar sands development, and yet they bear most of the risks.

It is the oil industry that is driving the massive expansion of the tar sands, and that expansion, in turn, is driving the construction of new and repurposed pipelines all over North America – through British Columbia to its pristine West Coast, through Central Canada and New England to the Atlantic Ocean, and through the Midwest, the breadbasket of America, to the Gulf of Mexico. As devastating spills in Michigan and Arkansas have proved, these pipelines inevitably will spill their toxic cargo along the way, poisoning waterways, polluting communities, and undermining livelihoods for thousands of people.

Perhaps the worst consequence of massive investment in tar sands expansion and the web of pipelines necessary to carry its dirty oil to market is that it locks us into relying on dirty oil for another century. This can only lead to the most catastrophic impacts of a climate warmed beyond recognition. The resulting six degree Celsius increase in global temperature will wreak havoc on the environmental, social and political stability that modern civilization requires to function.

The intractable problems and extraordinary risks of a tar sands world are just too great. Tar sands expansion must be stopped and, eventually, phased out altogether. Recent announcments, and the growing opposition to tar sands pipelines, indicates we're moving in the right direction (albeit slowly).

Stop the Expansion Updates & Resources

One amazing week in the fight against the tar sands

Mike Hudema | Greenpeace Canada - November 27th 2014

Blog Post: In the fight against the tar sands there are good weeks and bad weeks and then there are weeks like this one where you can’t help but feel that we might just win. If you are a person that cares about the health of the planet, that wants Canada to listen to science, and thinks we should stand up for the rights of the First Peoples of this land then this week is one that should make you breath a little easier, at least on the tar sands front.

Keeping it in the ground

Lorne Stockman and Steve Kretzmann | Oil Change International - November 7th 2014

Blog Post: Public opposition isn't just having an impact on carbon emissions -- it's having a MASSIVE impact. This chart compares these emissions savings against those of key climate policies of the Obama Administration. Should the emissions saved from demand-side policies, such as vehicle efficiency standards (CAFE) and power plant carbon rules, be compared to those saved by supply-side changes such as the cancellation of oil production projects? We believe the answer is yes.

The tar sands bubble

Brian Palmer | OnEarth - October 6th 2014

Press Clipping: The Canadian tar sands industry has seen better days. Energy giant Statoil announced last week that it would postpone a major mining project in Alberta for at least three years. It was just the latest in a string of major setbacks for tar sands oil, which has become nearly as bad for corporate profits as it is for the environment.

The battle against the tar sands is about to change

Mike Hudema | Greenpeace Canada - October 6th 2014

Blog Post: Resistance to the tar sands has not only grown in leaps and bounds, it is changing the dynamics of the entire fight. Last week's massive People's Climate March in New York that brought over 400,000 people to the streets of New York, led by climate impacted and Indigenous communities, was just one of many signs of hope that are starting to emerge. People are standing up to the largest carbon bullies on the planet and we are starting to win.

If a tar-sands project fails in the forest

Michael Brune | Sierra Club - October 2nd 2014

Blog Post: Back in March, I wrote about the Keystone XL, saying that any rejection of new tar sands pipelines serves the purpose of keeping this dirty oil in the ground. Some good news from last week proves the point that I and others have been making. The Norwegian energy firm Statoil announced that it would pull the plug on a planned multibillion-dollar, 40,000 barrel per day destructive tar sands project in Alberta. Which means we are kicking Keystone's keister.

People’s Climate March images for your use and enjoyment

September 26th 2014

Visual: TSSN is a service to the movement, so we sent a team of media makers to the People's Climate March to capture images for you. Have a look at these albums for photos capturing a few major events over the course of last weekend in New York. If you ever need an image for a blog post, social media graphic, press kit, etc. and so on, please use these freely!

Statoil calls off 40,000-bpd Canadian oil sand development

Feature

September 25th 2014

Press Clipping: Citing concerns about rising costs and lack of pipeline space, Norwegian energy firm Statoil announced it will postpone development of its 40,000 barrel per day Corner oil sands project in Alberta, Canada, for at least three years and cut about 70 jobs at its Canadian unit. Statoil is the first company in recent years to delay a thermal project in Alberta's oil sands, but earlier this year Total SA suspended work at its C$11 billion ($9.9 billion) Joslyn oil sand mine as it looks for ways to cut costs at the troubled project.

The case for a moratorium on tar sands development

Ed Struzik | Yale e360 - September 4th 2014

Press Clipping: Ecologist Wendy Palen is one of a group of scientists who recently called for a moratorium on new development of Alberta’s tar sands. In a Yale Environment 360 interview, she talks about why Canada and the U.S. need to reconsider the tar sands as part of a long-term energy policy.