Tar Sands Solutions Network

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Line 9

Enbridge has proposed to pump tar sands crude through a repurposed 500-mile pipeline that currently runs westward along the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway from Montreal, Quebec to Sarnia, Ontario. Enbridge, the same company responsible for the devastating pipeline spill of one million gallons of tar sands crude into Michigan’s Kalamazoo River, wants to reverse Line 9 so it can carry tar sands crude to Montreal (and then on to a harbour and oil terminal in South Portland, Maine).

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Overview:

- An aging 500-mile natural gas pipeline that will be reversed to carry tar sands crude through Ontario and Quebec

Key Problems:

- Reversing old pipelines means risks of more leaks and spills

- Natural gas pipelines were not built to carry corrosive tar sands crude

- This leak-prone pipeline crosses dozens of major rivers and runs through major urban centers

Current Status:

- Line 9 has been approved by Canada's National Energy Board.

This pipeline runs through or close to many major urban centres, including Hamilton, Toronto, Kingston, Cornwall, and Montreal, home to millions of people. It also crosses dozens of major rivers and streams that flow into the Great Lakes, a major source of drinking water. A pipeline spill anywhere along this route would have disastrous consequences.

Line 9 Updates & Resources

How a town in Maine is blocking an Exxon tar-sands pipeline

Feature

Roger Drouin | Grist - July 23rd 2014

Press Clipping: Citizens trying to stop the piping of tar-sands oil through their community wore blue “Clear Skies” shirts at a city council meeting in South Portland, Maine, this week. But they might as well have been wearing boxing gloves. The small city struck a mighty blow against Canadian tar-sands extraction. “It’s been a long fight,” said resident Andy Jones after a 6-1 city council vote on Monday to approve the Clear Skies Ordinance, which will block the loading of heavy tar-sands bitumen onto tankers at the city’s port.

Energy East, Line 9 pipelines will have “insignificant” economic impact on Quebec, says report

Derek Leahy | DeSmog Canada - June 19th 2014

Press Clipping: Quebec will gain “minimal economic benefits” from west-to-east oil pipeline projects such as TransCanada’s Energy East and Enbridge’s Line 9 according to a new report released this month. Both projects would transport western Canadian oil and oilsands (also called tar sands) bitumen to refineries and ports in Quebec, but would only make a combined 0.50 per cent contribution to economic activity and 0.30 per cent to jobs in the province.

Vermont Olympians considered about climate change, tar sands pipelines

Editors - April 29th 2014

Blog Post: Four of Vermont’s most prominent athletes spoke out at Morse Farm on Monday to voice their concerns about the threats posed by climate change and tar sands fuel being transported through the state via an aging pipeline that runs from Montreal to Portland, Maine. The athletes called for Vermont to take a lead in rejecting dirty fuel sources that cause global warming pollution, and build on successes in promoting clean, renewable energy.

Portland-Montreal Pipeline Already Past Retirement Date

Miles Grant | National Wildlife Federation - March 13th 2014

Blog Post: The Exxon-owned Portland Pipe Line Corporation (PPLC) seeks to reverse its aging Portland-to-Montreal pipeline to transport heavy, corrosive, toxic tar sands oil. The problem is it’s already passed its projected retirement date. "This is yet another reason any tar sands project in Northern New England is far too risky," said Jim Murphy, senior counsel at the National Wildlife Federation’s Northeast Regional Center. “As we saw with the tragic tar sands oil disaster in Mayflower, Arkansas, last year, these old pipelines can and will fail."

Americans decry NEB approval of Line 9 pipeline reversal

The Editors | Tar Sands Solutions Network - March 7th 2014

Blog Post: Canada’s National Energy Board (NEB) today announced its approval of pipeline giant Enbridge’s plan to reverse its Canadian Line 9 pipeline to bring tar sands east to Montreal. In doing so, the Canadian government has opened the way for toxic tar sands to come to Vermont. This comes only two days after 13 towns on and near the pipeline’s route in Vermont, as well as from other corners of the state, passed resolutions at Town Meeting stating opposition to tar sands transport here.