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Energy East

Energy East is a proposal by TransCanada Pipelines Limited to create a dangerous pipeline network stretching 4,500 km from southern Alberta to New Brunswick. TransCanada wants to use Energy East to transport 1.1 million barrels of toxic tar sands oil a day.

Energy East is not a “Made in Canada” oil solution. Energy East would be the largest oil pipeline project in North America, and would put hundreds of communities at risk of a tar sands oil spill like the one that devastated Mayflower, AK.

Little of the oil transported by Energy East would stay in Canada. Instead, between 750,000 and one million barrels of unrefined oil would be exported out of Canada every single day. That’s the equivalent of 50 Olympic-sized swimming pools of oil – every day.

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Overview:
TransCanada pipeline proposal to transport tar sands crude to New Brunswick 
Key Problems:
- Converting this aging natural gas pipeline to tar sands crude would make it prone to leaks and spills
- This pipeline ruptured and exploded in 1995, causing a huge fire
- Would put millions of Canadians in six provinces at risk of a tar sands oil spill 
Current Status:
Thousands of citizens and numerous city councils oppose this risky proposal

TransCanada’s proposal involves three main pieces.

First, it requires converting 3,000 km of an aging natural gas pipeline to carry tar sands oil. The existing natural gas pipeline runs from Alberta to eastern Ontario. Evidence indicates that converting a main natural gas pipeline to ship oil could increase the cost of natural gas for customers in Ontario and Quebec.

Energy East also requires the construction of new sections of pipeline, the largest of which would run from eastern Ontario more than 1,5400 km across southern Quebec to Saint John, New Brunswick. Along with the segment to be converted, this would mean millions of people in six provinces would be at risk of a tar sands oil spill.

Then there’s the construction of two oil export terminals, one planned for the south shore of the St. Lawrence River and one in Saint John, NB. This will increase the number of oil tankers plying the waters of the St. Lawrence River and the Atlantic Ocean, putting at risk maritime economies and communities from inevitable tar sands spills.

Despite TransCanada’s assurances about safety, the company has had many oil spills and safety problems with its pipelines. In 1995, the same natural gas pipeline that TransCanada intends to convert to tar sands oil ruptured, causing a huge explosion and fire in southern Manitoba. In 2011, the first phase of TransCanada’s Keystone pipeline spilled 12 times in its first year of operation, one of the worst first-year spill rates on record for a pipeline. One incident created a crude oil geyser six stories high. TransCanada had boasted about its “world class safety standards” and predicted a spill rate of only 1.4 times per decade.

Energy East Updates & Resources

Protesters target Justin Trudeau in Chester

Gordon Delaney | Halifax Herald - August 25th 2014

Press Clipping: A group of environmentalists worried about climate change delivered their message Sunday to federal Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau during a Chester fundraising stop. A dozen community activists held a brief and peaceful protest outside a $500-a-plate Liberal fundraising event at the seaside home of real estate developer Jon Dimock.

Anishinaabeg decry TransCanada’s Energy East Pipeline at Kenora open house

Crystal Green | IC Magazine - August 14th 2014

Press Clipping: Anishinaabeg and fellow Energy East pipeline resisters made a presence inside and outside Lakeside Inn on Tuesday, Aug. 12 for TransCanada’s second Kenora, Ont., open house. This time, the people weren’t interested in hearing TransCanada’s “information session” pitch. The tradeshow set-up had booths, corporate fact-sheets, and enough staff for one-on-one interactions to keep concerned citizens unaware of each other’s objections to the proposed Energy East pipeline.

Civil society groups launch “People’s Intervention” Campaign to fight TransCanada pipeline

Editors | Tar Sands Solutions Network - July 29th 2014

Blog Post: As TransCanada prepares to file a proposal to the National Energy Board for its Energy East pipeline, 350.org, the Council of Canadians, and Leadnow.ca have launched a campaign calling for climate change and community voices to be included in the National Energy Board’s review of the mega-project. “Almost 10,000 people have already sent messages to the National Energy Board demanding a fair review of this pipeline,” says Cameron Fenton, Canadian tar sands organizer with 350.org. “The question now is whether the NEB and the government will listen to communities, or push for a rubber stamp on this project.”

In the heart of the oil sands, a new fight over pipelines

Shawn McCarthy | Globe and Mail - July 23rd 2014

Press Clipping: Canada’s oil sands producers are facing a pipeline brouhaha in their own backyard that could threaten expansion plans by strangling their access to markets. TransCanada and Phoenix Energy are proposing to build the $3-billion Grand Rapids pipeline to transport 900,000 barrels a day of blended bitumen from Fort McMurray to the Edmonton area. But the project is under fire from landowners, environmentalists and the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation (ACFN), who complain it is being fast-tracked without proper environmental assessment.

Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation pulls out of Grand Rapids Hearings

July 20th 2014

Visual: Today the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation (ACFN) announced they will no longer participate in the TransCanada Grand Rapids Pipeline hearing citing impossible timelines and prejudice within the process. The First Nation is referring to the project as the “Mother of All Pipelines,” feeding projects like the Energy East Pipeline and the controversial Keystone XL pipeline projects.

If Alberta oil heads east, benefits for Ontario are hard to see

Jeff Rubin | The Globe and Mail - July 7th 2014

Press Clipping: Kathleen Wynne has just as much reason to worry about a new pipeline passing through central Canada as Christy Clark does about seeing one head to the West Coast. Part of TransCanada’s plan for building Energy East includes converting an existing natural gas pipeline to carry bitumen from the oil sands. The move to retrofit the line isn’t without costs to Ontario.

TransCanada’s donation to Ontario town comes with ‘gag’ conditions

Jeremy Van Loon | Bloomberg News - July 6th 2014

Press Clipping: TransCanada Corp. provided an Ontario town along the proposed Energy East pipeline route with cash to buy a rescue truck on conditions that include the municipality not comment on the company’s operations. TransCanada gave Mattawa $30,000 under its community engagement program, according to an agreement appended to the agenda of the town council’s June 23 meeting.

Energy East, Line 9 pipelines will have “insignificant” economic impact on Quebec, says report

Derek Leahy | DeSmog Canada - June 19th 2014

Press Clipping: Quebec will gain “minimal economic benefits” from west-to-east oil pipeline projects such as TransCanada’s Energy East and Enbridge’s Line 9 according to a new report released this month. Both projects would transport western Canadian oil and oilsands (also called tar sands) bitumen to refineries and ports in Quebec, but would only make a combined 0.50 per cent contribution to economic activity and 0.30 per cent to jobs in the province.