Tar Sands Solutions Network

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Energy East

Energy East is a proposal by TransCanada Pipelines Limited to create a dangerous pipeline network stretching 4,500 km from southern Alberta to New Brunswick. TransCanada wants to use Energy East to transport 1.1 million barrels of toxic tar sands oil a day.

Energy East is not a “Made in Canada” oil solution. Energy East would be the largest oil pipeline project in North America, and would put hundreds of communities at risk of a tar sands oil spill like the one that devastated Mayflower, AK.

Little of the oil transported by Energy East would stay in Canada. Instead, between 750,000 and one million barrels of unrefined oil would be exported out of Canada every single day. That’s the equivalent of 50 Olympic-sized swimming pools of oil – every day.

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Overview:
TransCanada pipeline proposal to transport tar sands crude to New Brunswick 
Key Problems:
- Converting this aging natural gas pipeline to tar sands crude would make it prone to leaks and spills
- This pipeline ruptured and exploded in 1995, causing a huge fire
- Would put millions of Canadians in six provinces at risk of a tar sands oil spill 
Current Status:
Thousands of citizens and numerous city councils oppose this risky proposal

TransCanada’s proposal involves three main pieces.

First, it requires converting 3,000 km of an aging natural gas pipeline to carry tar sands oil. The existing natural gas pipeline runs from Alberta to eastern Ontario. Evidence indicates that converting a main natural gas pipeline to ship oil could increase the cost of natural gas for customers in Ontario and Quebec.

Energy East also requires the construction of new sections of pipeline, the largest of which would run from eastern Ontario more than 1,5400 km across southern Quebec to Saint John, New Brunswick. Along with the segment to be converted, this would mean millions of people in six provinces would be at risk of a tar sands oil spill.

Then there’s the construction of two oil export terminals, one planned for the south shore of the St. Lawrence River and one in Saint John, NB. This will increase the number of oil tankers plying the waters of the St. Lawrence River and the Atlantic Ocean, putting at risk maritime economies and communities from inevitable tar sands spills.

Despite TransCanada’s assurances about safety, the company has had many oil spills and safety problems with its pipelines. In 1995, the same natural gas pipeline that TransCanada intends to convert to tar sands oil ruptured, causing a huge explosion and fire in southern Manitoba. In 2011, the first phase of TransCanada’s Keystone pipeline spilled 12 times in its first year of operation, one of the worst first-year spill rates on record for a pipeline. One incident created a crude oil geyser six stories high. TransCanada had boasted about its “world class safety standards” and predicted a spill rate of only 1.4 times per decade.

Energy East Updates & Resources

If Alberta oil heads east, benefits for Ontario are hard to see

Jeff Rubin | The Globe and Mail - July 7th 2014

Press Clipping: Kathleen Wynne has just as much reason to worry about a new pipeline passing through central Canada as Christy Clark does about seeing one head to the West Coast. Part of TransCanada’s plan for building Energy East includes converting an existing natural gas pipeline to carry bitumen from the oil sands. The move to retrofit the line isn’t without costs to Ontario.

TransCanada’s donation to Ontario town comes with ‘gag’ conditions

Jeremy Van Loon | Bloomberg News - July 6th 2014

Press Clipping: TransCanada Corp. provided an Ontario town along the proposed Energy East pipeline route with cash to buy a rescue truck on conditions that include the municipality not comment on the company’s operations. TransCanada gave Mattawa $30,000 under its community engagement program, according to an agreement appended to the agenda of the town council’s June 23 meeting.

Energy East, Line 9 pipelines will have “insignificant” economic impact on Quebec, says report

Derek Leahy | DeSmog Canada - June 19th 2014

Press Clipping: Quebec will gain “minimal economic benefits” from west-to-east oil pipeline projects such as TransCanada’s Energy East and Enbridge’s Line 9 according to a new report released this month. Both projects would transport western Canadian oil and oilsands (also called tar sands) bitumen to refineries and ports in Quebec, but would only make a combined 0.50 per cent contribution to economic activity and 0.30 per cent to jobs in the province.

The People are bigger than the pipelines

Feature

Jason Mogus | Defend Our Climate Coalition - May 12th 2014

Blog Post: The May 10 day of action happened in almost 100 communities all across Canada, and was but one stop in many years of growing protests. Let’s look at how opposition has formed around the 5 major pipeline projects proposed to expand the tar sands to climate killing levels.

Defend Our Climate and Your Community on May 10

Feature

Editors | Tar Sands Solutions Network - May 1st 2014

Blog Post: Teika Newton is one of hundreds of Canadians who are stepping up to defend their communities against oil pipelines, dirty energy projects and runaway climate change on May 10. "People are realizing that climate change is real, and that if we don't act now we're putting ourselves at risk.” Join her and thousands of other Canadians who will be defending our climate and communities on May 10.

Energy East: The risky pipeline bigger than Keystone XL

Adam Scott, Climate & Energy Program Manager | Environmental Defence - April 12th 2014

Blog Post: TransCanada’s controversial Keystone XL pipeline project generates a lot of headlines. But did you know another risky TransCanada project – even larger than Keystone – is on the horizon and could put hundreds of communities across Canada at risk of an oil spill? TransCanada’s Energy East is a pipeline plan to get tar sands oil from Alberta to the east coast, in one massive hail mary pass. Energy East is intended to export vast quantities of unrefined tar sands oil.